OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 7 taxa in the family Bignoniaceae, Trumpet Creeper family, as understood by PLANTS National Database.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Crossvine

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Bignonia capreolata   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Bignonia capreolata   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Anisostichus capreolata 167-01-001   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

 

Habitat: Swamp forests, bottomlands, forests, woodlands

Common (uncommon in Mountains of GA & SC) (rare in Mountains of NC)

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon Common Name: Claw-vine, Cat's-claw-vine

Weakley's Flora: (4/14/23) Dolichandra unguis-cati   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Macfadyena unguis-cati   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

 

Habitat: Disturbed areas, fruit groves, hammock edges, cultivated and naturalized

Rare

Non-native: tropical America

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Trumpetcreeper, Trumpet Vine, Cow-Itch Vine

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Campsis radicans   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Campsis radicans   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Campsis radicans 167-02-001   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

 

Habitat: Bottomland forests, swamp forests, fencerows, old fields, forests, thickets, disturbed areas

Common

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Southern Catalpa, Fishbait Tree, Cigar Tree

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Catalpa bignonioides   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Catalpa bignonioides   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Catalpa bignonioides 167-03-001   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

 

Habitat: Bottomlands and streambanks (as a native), escaped or persistent after cultivation

Uncommon

Native to Coastal Plain of SC & GA, early naturalized in a more widespread area

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Northern Catalpa, Indian Cigar Tree, Catawba Tree

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Catalpa speciosa   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Catalpa speciosa   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Catalpa speciosa 167-03-002   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

 

Habitat: Bottomland forests, stream banks, and mesic upland forests (as a native), also old fields, roadsides, moist disturbed areas, suburban woodlands, eastwards of its native range escaped or persistent after cultivation, and sometimes thoroughly naturalized

Uncommon in Carolina Mountains & NC Piedmont (rare elsewhere in GA-NC-SC)

Native: west of Carolinas & Georgia, early naturalized in a more widespread area

 


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speaker icon Common Name: Farges Catalpa

Catalpa fargesii

PLANTS National Database: Catalpa fargesii   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

 

Non-native

 


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Common Name: Chinese Catalpa

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Catalpa ovata   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Catalpa ovata   FAMILY: Bignoniaceae

 

Habitat: Suburban woodlands

Non-native: China

 


Your search found 7 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"When designing a butterfly garden, you need two types of plants: species that provide nectar for adults, and species that are host plants for butterfly larvae. Most people focus only on the plants that produce nectar. Even worse, they often turn to alien plants that are promoted as being good for butterflies." — Douglas W. Tallamy, Bringing Nature Home