Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas and Georgia


"In creating this website, Janie has made a huge amount of important information easily accessible and useful to thousands of people." — South Carolina Wildlife Federation

"Amazing and well done. I think it is very useful and when completed will be a resource that native plant enthusiasts, botanists, students (and my students!) could use extensively."— Patrick D. McMillan, Clemson University

"I was looking at your WEB site — very informative!" — Judy Gordon, Augusta State University

"Janie Marlow's presentation on brought the audience at the 2008 SC Master Gardener State Conference in Greenville to a standing ovation, not a common sight at an educational conference." — SC Midlands Master Gardeners Association

"Since your wonderful presentation at the SE EPPC Symposium, I have had the good chance to relish and use your masterful website and be comforted in knowing that it is there for all of us — A true bridge between inquiring humans and our plant companions...." James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station

"What a great web site!" — Dixie Damrel, Curator of the Herbarium, Clemson University

"You have done something wonderful! I’m sure you realize by now how impressed the Cullowhee participants are with your website; it was a common source of discussion for the remainder of the conference. Congratulations!" — John Manion, Historic Gardens Curator, Atlanta History Center

"I really like your web site and am recommending to friends and constituents who want to learn about the flora of the Carolinas. A lot of information specific to our lovely state is available and readily accessible at one site." — Bert Pittman, SC Department of Natural Resources




All quotes are used by permission.

"Your presentation at Cullowhee was great and I heard several comments on the website's present and potential value." — Ron Lance, author of Woody Plants of the Southeastern United States, a Winter Guide

"I like it." — John M. Schmidt, Winthrop University

"You have put together an excellent resource for plants that is organized very well.... I want you to know that I feel honored that you have asked me to be a part of your site." — Kevin Adams, Kevin Adams Photography

"As I mentioned at the conference, I was blown away by your website. I know everyone else was too. I tried it out when I got home and am amazed and impressed." — Jane Thomas, Corneille Bryan Native Garden

"I have had a chance to look at the website and have found it to be useful and have recommended it to others as a reference." — Tim Lee, SC State Park Service

"Great work you have done here. It has great potential to be a useful tool to so many." — Rick Huffman, SC Native Plant Society

"I think it's a tremendous service to put out all of this information on your site!" — Lisa Wagner, South Carolina Botanical Garden

"I was very impressed with the site — it is a wonderful resource." — Mike Strickland, Georgia Native Plant Society member

"It has huge possibilities — with careful work and adhering to a high degree of accuracy, it could be come a photographic addendum to the Flora of the Carolinas.... Even at first glance, it brings so much to the 'table' having multiple descriptive sources for each plant, multiple photos for each subject (missing and not really possible in so many of the good field guides), and the possibility of so much more." — Jim Fowler, author of Wild Orchids of South Carolina

"Superlative! Superlative! Superlative! Look it up in Roget's and take your choice! That's my reaction to your website introduction at Cullowhee." — Glenn Palmer, Botanical Gardens at Asheville

What one tool is common to the effort to

  • preserve wild spaces?
  • maintain the health of natural ecosystems?
  • protect rare species?
  • battle invasives? or
  • encourage the landscape use of regionally native plants?      Education.

Eastern Red Maple

“People only protect what they love,
but they can only love what they know.” — Jacques-Yves Cousteau

The website is a public education endeavor: It is a clearinghouse of information about native and naturalized plants of the Carolinas and Georgia, including plants found throughout the Southeast. It “packages” knowledge that plant people have patiently shared and provides a venue for that sharing.

For those of us who are not botanists, is like a window, a bridge to the body of knowledge that’s there but we don’t know how to access. And it invites us to enter. It’s useful to students, of course, but it’s also useful to ordinary people who are curious about the natural world. Discovering the identity of just one wild plant means that the green blur is now made up of individuals, each with a name. One can allow oneself to become interested....

There’s more in the site than is immediately obvious, and I can do a short powerpoint presentation for your group, demonstrating how it can be used.

People sometimes ask, how did this website come to be? The idea had been in my mind for years. A collection of native plant photographs (my original 40-hour volunteer commitment for Master Gardeners) spurred me on. As I worked on that, I gradually came to the conclusion that a website such as I envisioned — the website that I wished existed — probably wouldn’t happen unless I built it. The idea took on a life of its own; I joined the South Carolina Native Plant Society and set to work.

I had no idea how many thousands of hours I would invest, but I knew that I didn't possess the knowledge needed. would not be possible without the help of many patient and knowledgeable people. Perhaps you have something to add? Your contributions* are welcome!

Thank you!
Janie Marlow
Travelers Rest, SC
webmaster @

*I'm referring above to contributions of time (I have a list of chores you can pick from), or of knowledge, or a combination (are you willing to read and record Latin names?), or of photographs of under-represented plants or features, or of other things you might suggest that I haven't thought of. There are not a lot of expenses incurred by the project, but it does demand enormous amounts of time. If you feel led to help in a financial way, that would be welcome, and you may send a check to the SC Native Plant Society at PO Box 491, Norris, SC 29667. They are a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Please include a prominent note that it is to be used to support further development of