Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


211

Forb
Perennial

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia
Documented growing wild in GA NC SC

Uncommon in Carolina Piedmont, rare elsewhere within GA-NC-SC

Look for it in woodlands, meadows, forests, usually in circumneutral soils (over diabase, limestone, shell, etc), per Weakley's Flora

map
To see a detailed map, click here

 

full sun partial shade ...Moist ...Dry

LEAVES:
Simple
Opposite

FLOWER:
Spring/Summer
Lavender (rarely white)
Bisexual
Bilaterally symmetrical
2-lipped calyx
2-lipped 4-lobed corolla
2 exserted stamens
Superior ovary

FRUIT:
Summer/Fall
Schizocarp of mericarps

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Asterids: Lamiids: Lamiales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Blephilia ciliata   FAMILY Lamiaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Blephilia ciliata   FAMILY Lamiaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS (1968) 164-24-002:
Blephilia ciliata   FAMILY Lamiaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Manual of the Southeastern Flora (Small, 1933)
Blephilia ciliata

 

COMMON NAME:
Diabase Woodmint, Horsemint, Downy Woodmint


Click or hover over the thumbnails to see larger pictures.

picture of Blephilia ciliata, image of Blephilia ciliata

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913    pnd_blci_001_lvd

        

picture of Blephilia ciliata, image of Blephilia ciliata

JK Marlow    jkm180506_1993

May    Crawford County    GA

Leaves with rounded to acutish tips (Prunella-like); petioles 1-7(12)mm long, per Weakley's Flora.

picture of Blephilia ciliata, image of Blephilia ciliata

Richard and Teresa Ware    rtw_blephilia_ciliata_5

May        

Leaves lanceolate to elliptic, often curving downward, per Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses.

picture of Blephilia ciliata, image of Blephilia ciliata

Richard and Teresa Ware    rtw_b_ciliata_downy

June        

Two to six dense whorls of flowers encircle square hairy stems at intervals, per Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses.