OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 6 taxa in the family Hippocastanaceae, Buckeye family, as understood by Vascular Flora of the Carolinas.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Painted Buckeye

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus sylvatica   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus sylvatica   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Aesculus sylvatica 116-01-001   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: In the Piedmont in mesic, nutrient-rich forests, on bottomlands, lower slopes, and in ravines, in the Coastal Plain primarily on floodplains of brownwater (alluvium-carrying) rivers (most notably the Roanoke River in NC), in the Mountains only at low elevations

Common in Piedmont (uncommon ro rare elsewhere in GA-NC-SC)

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Red Buckeye

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus pavia var. pavia   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus pavia var. pavia   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

INCLUDED WITHIN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Aesculus pavia 116-01-002   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: Coastal Plain marl forests (wet, calcareous flats), hardwood bluffs, rich floodplains of brownwater and blackwater rivers, basic-mesic forests, shell hammocks and shell middens, calcium-rich sandy soils in maritime forests

Common in GA Mountains & in Coastal Plain of GA & SC (uncommon in NC Coastal Plain) (rare in Piedmont)

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Yellow Buckeye

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus flava   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus flava   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Aesculus octandra 116-01-003   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: Moist forests, up to nearly 2000 m, especially prominent in seepy cove forests, in the Piedmont only in ‘montane’ habitats

Common in Mountains, rare in Piedmont

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Ohio Buckeye, Fetid Buckeye, Chalky Buckeye

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus glabra var. glabra   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus glabra var. glabra   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: Mesic upland and riparian forests, bluffs, ravines, stream banks; usually over calcareous substrates

Rare

Native to Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Bottlebrush Buckeye

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus parviflora   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus parviflora   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: Mesic forests on bluffs and in ravines (the SC occurrence is on Fall Line river bluffs, with shaley, subcalcareous soils)

Rare in GA & SC (waifs in NC)

Native to South Carolina & Georgia

 


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camera icon Common Name: Horsechestnut

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Aesculus hippocastanum   FAMILY: Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Aesculus hippocastanum   FAMILY: Hippocastanaceae

 

Habitat: Urban and suburban areas, perhaps not definitely naturalized, but fairly often planted as a street tree and escaping as seedlings in the vicinity of plantings

Waif(s)

Non-native: southeast Europe

 


Your search found 6 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Surrounding the reproductive organs in most flowers, there are two sets of floral parts. The upper set is the petals, which may be of any color; the lower set is the sepals, which are usually green. However, if only one set is present they are considered to be sepals, even though they are brightly colored." — Lawrence Newcomb, Newcomb's Wildflower Guide