Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


119

Shrub; Subshrub
Perennial

Native: north of the Carolinas
Documented growing wild in - - -

Rare

Look for it on high elevation granitic outcrop (in VA), per Weakley's Flora

map
To see a detailed map, click here

 

full sun ...Dry

LEAVES:
Evergreen
Simple
Alternate

FLOWER:
Spring/Summer
White tinged pink
Bisexual
5 sepals
5-lobed urceolate corolla
(8-)10 included stamens
Superior ovary

FRUIT:
Summer/Fall
Red
Drupe

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Asterids: Ericales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi   FAMILY Ericaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Arctostaphylos uva-ursi   FAMILY Ericaceae

 

COMMON NAME:
Bearberry, Kinnikinick


Click or hover over the thumbnails to see larger pictures.

picture of -, image of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913    pnd_uvuv_001_lvd

        

picture of -, image of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

JK Marlow    jkm090923_009

September    Hancock County    ME

Fruit ... a red drupe, per Weakley's Flora.

picture of -, image of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

JK Marlow    jkm090923_011

September    Hancock County    ME

Leaves scattered along the stem, glabrous, 1-3cm long, tapered to the base, per Field Guide to Acadia National Park by Russell D. Butcher.

picture of -, image of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

JK Marlow    jkm090923_012

September    Hancock County    ME

Bearberry is an attractive little ground-covering evergreen, per Field Guide to Acadia National Park by Russell D. Butcher.

picture of -, image of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

JK Marlow    jkm090924_062

September    Hancock County    ME

Acadia National Park: Wild Gardens of Acadia

picture of -, image of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

JK Marlow    jkm090924_063

September    Hancock County    ME

Acadia National Park: Wild Gardens of Acadia

Dark green paddle-shaped leaves grow from stems with reddish bark, per Field Guide to Acadia National Park by Russell D. Butcher.