Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 3 taxa in the family Osmundaceae, Royal Fern family, as understood by PLANTS National Database.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Cinnamon Fern
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Osmundastrum cinnamomeum   FAMILY: Osmundaceae
INCLUDING PLANTS National Database: Osmunda cinnamomea var. cinnamomea   FAMILY: Osmundaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Osmunda cinnamomea 007-01-001   FAMILY: Osmundaceae

 

Look for it in bogs, peatlands, pocosins, wet savannas, floodplains, blackwater stream swamps & other wetlands

Common

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Interrupted Fern
Weakley's Flora: (6/30/18) Claytosmunda claytoniana   FAMILY: Osmundaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Osmunda claytoniana   FAMILY: Osmundaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Osmunda claytoniana 007-01-002   FAMILY: Osmundaceae

 

Look for it in upland forests, woodlands, and balds, moist to rather dry

Common in Mountains, rare in Piedmont

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: American Royal Fern
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Osmunda spectabilis   FAMILY: Osmundaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Osmunda regalis var. spectabilis   FAMILY: Osmundaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Osmunda regalis var. spectabilis 007-01-003   FAMILY: Osmundaceae

 

Look for it in bogs, marshes (including tidal), moist forests, floodplains, swamp forests, & other wetlands

Common

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


Your search found 3 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Common names should be written in lower case unless part of the name is proper and then the first letter of only the proper term is capitalized. For example, sugar maple would be written with lower case letters while Japanese maple would be written with the capital J. This is the accepted method for writing common names in scientific circles and should be familiar to the student. In this text, and many others, common names are written with capital first letters. This was done to set the name off from the rest of the sentence and make it more evident to the reader. Actually in modern horticultural writings the capitalized common name predominates." — Michael Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants