Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Your search found 4 taxa.

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camera icon Common Name: Little Floating Heart
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Nymphoides cordata
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Nymphoides cordata
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Nymphoides cordata 155-06-001

SYNONYMOUS WITH (ORTHOGRAPHIC VARIANT) Britton & Brown Illus Flora of Northeast US & adjacent Canada (Gleason, 1952) Nymphoides cordatum


Flower clusters grow from the stem shortly below the leaf, per Wildflowers of the Sandhills Region.


camera icon Common Name: Big Floating Heart, Banana Floating Heart
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Nymphoides aquatica
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Nymphoides aquatica
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Nymphoides aquatica 155-06-002

SYNONYMOUS WITH (ORTHOGRAPHIC VARIANT) Britton & Brown Illus Flora of Northeast US & adjacent Canada (Gleason, 1952) Nymphoides aquaticum


Stem terminates in an umbel of flowers and one leaf with a short stalk, per Guide to the Wildflowers of SC.


camera icon Common Name: Crested Floating Heart, Water Snowflake
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Nymphoides cristata
(?) PLANTS National Database: Nymphoides cristata

Flowers white, adaxial petal surface bearing a ruffled crest down its length, per Weakley's Flora.


camera icon Common Name: Yellow Floating Heart
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Nymphoides peltata
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Nymphoides peltata

SYNONYMOUS WITH (ORTHOGRAPHIC VARIANT) Britton & Brown Illus Flora of Northeast US & adjacent Canada (Gleason, 1952) Nymphoides peltatum


Flowers yellow, lobes spreading, 0.8-1" long, somewhat fringed below, per Wildflowers of Tennessee.


Your search found 4 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Most flowers are based on a particular numerical plan.... The ending -merous, along with a numerical prefix, is used to indicate a flower's numerical plan. For example, a flower might have four sepals, four petals, eight stamens, and four carpels; such a flower would be described as 4-merous." — Judd et al, Plant Systematics, a Phylogenetic Approach